5.3.14

How to Copy a Cake Design

Sometimes customers would point to a cake you have done and say they would like to have the same thing. I was deciding either to name this post "How to Copy a Cake Design" or "Similar, but not the Same". I chose the former because what is the point of writing a blog post if one is afraid of giving one's point of view? And so, may this post reach as many as possible who is searching for "copying rules" in the cake industry. To each their own, but I would like to base my views on Kara Buntin's research and post. 

To ensure each couple has their own personalised design, things that can be changed include colour, number of tiers, height of tiers, techniques, flower types...etc. Below are examples of cakes given a little twist.

The first example.
A champagne and white colour theme with calla lilies and sweetpeas, pleats and a little lace effect.

Turned into,
shades of turquoise, tiers of different heights and a different type of lace effect.

The second example.
Ruffles, stones and a monogram. 

Turned into,
a change of colour for the second tier, and brush embroidery to replace stones.

A third example.
Peach coloured roses with leaves and vines to look like a garden. 


Turned into,
a change of colours for the roses.
The petals of each rose has 3 shades of colours, 
trying out a technique that does away with dusting, but still provides tone.  

When you modify your own design, the overall look remains the same, the details changes. If this were to be explained in percentages, let's say 20% of difference. But off course the percentage of difference you want to achieve is in your hands. When it comes to replicating the design of others, even if you try to stick to the same detailing, the overall look would be different. Unless the design is very simple, or it is a class taught design.

Please excuse the confusion, I sometimes blog as a work journal. To keep track of my thoughts as the number of cakes increases. As Malcolm Gladwell in his book "Outliers" says that it will take 10,000 hours of work to achieve a breakthrough.


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